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Effective Method for Extraction of Cell-Free DNA from Maternal Plasma for Non-Invasive First-Trimester Fetal Gender Determination: A Preliminary Study
J Genet Med 2010;7:53-58
Published online June 30, 2010;  http://dx.doi.org/10.5734/JGM.2010.7.1.53
© 2010 Korean Society of Medical Genetics.

Ji Hyae Lim1, So Yeon Park1, Shin Young Kim1, Do Jin Kim1Mee Jin Kim1, Jae Hyug Yang2, Moon Young Kim2Min Hyoung Kim2, Ho Won Han2, Kyu Hong Choi2 and Hyun Mee Ryu1, 2

1Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Medical Research Institute, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Center, Seoul, Korea;
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Center KwanDong University college of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
Abstract
Purpose: To find the most effective method for extraction of cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) from maternal plasma, we compared a blood DNA extraction system (blood kit) and a viral DNA extraction system (viral kit) for non-invasive first-trimester fetal gender determination. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted with maternal plasma collected from 44 women in the first-trimester of pregnancy. The cf-DNA was extracted from maternal plasma using a blood kit and a viral kit. Quantitative fluorescent-polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) was used to detect the SRY gene and AMEL gene. The diagnostic accuracy of the QF-PCR results was determined based on comparison with the final delivery records. Results: A total of 44 women were tested, but the final delivery record was only obtained in 36 cases which included 16 male-bearing and 20 female-bearing pregnancies. For the blood kit and viral kit, the diagnostic accuracies for fetal gender determination were 63.9% (23/36) and 97.2% (35/36), respectively. Conclusion: In non-invasive first-trimester fetal gender determination by QF-PCR, using a viral kit for extraction of cf-DNA may result in a higher diagnostic accuracy.
Keywords : Cell free DNA (cf-DNA);Quantitative fluorescent-polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR);Non-invasive fetal gender detection;
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